Government Funding for Adults

While the Ontario Autism Program doesn’t currently extend past the age of 18, there are some government funding options for autistic and/or disabled adults.  

Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP)

The Ontario Disability Support Program provides two different types of assistance for adults 18 and older with disabilities in Ontario. 

Income support - Financial assistance provided monthly to help with the costs of basic needs, like food, clothing and shelter. Income support also includes benefits, like drug coverage and vision care, for clients and their eligible family members. 

Employment Support - Services and supports to help people with disabilities find and keep work. 

To learn if you or a loved one is eligible, visit: https://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/social/odsp/ 

Developmental Services Ontario (DSO) & Passport Funding

Passport is a funding program that helps adults 18 years or older with a developmental disability to participate in their communities. It also helps caregivers of an adult with a developmental disability take a break from their caregiving responsibilities. Passport is funded by the Ontario Government and administered by local Passport Agencies. 

Learn more here: https://www.dsontario.ca/passport-program

Disability Tax Credit (DTC)

The disability tax credit is a non-refundable tax credit that helps persons with disabilities or their supporting persons reduce the amount of income tax they may have to pay. An individual may claim the disability amount once they are eligible for the DTC. This amount includes a supplement for persons under 18 years of age at the end of the year.

To learn if you or a loved one is eligible, visit: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/segments/tax-credits-deductions-persons-disabilities/disability-tax-credit.html

Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP)

A registered disability savings plan (RDSP) is a savings plan that is intended to help parents and others save for the long term financial security of a person who is eligible for the disability tax credit (DTC).

Learn more here: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/registered-disability-savings-plan-rdsp.html

Henson Trusts

The most well-known and commonly used Trust among families of people with disabilities is the Absolute Discretionary Trust, more commonly known as the “Henson” Trust. It is a special type of Trust arrangement in which the Beneficiary is considered not to have any legal claim to the property held in Trust, and therefore, the property is not considered an asset of the Beneficiary when determining eligibility for ODSP. In short, a Henson Trust renders the property invisible to ODSP for as long as the property remains in the Trust.

Learn more here: https://pooranlaw.com/wholelifeplanning/questions/wills-trusts-estates/hensontrusts/

 

External Resources

P4P Planning Network
https://www.planningnetwork.ca/
ConnectABILITY
https://connectability.ca/2014/12/09/financial-and-legal-issues-2/
Pooran Law
https://pooranlaw.com/
Microboards Ontario
https://www.microboardsontario.com/